GF Chocolate Chip Cookies And Working With The Heart

IMG_3159

Week five of study retreat. Each week has been steadily less and less in retreat mode, as regular life needs creep steadily in. Around week three I started panicking about all the things that would need to be done if I left them till the end. Around week four I realized that a lot of things couldn’t be left till the end. And now I am just trying not to feel too feckless or lacking in diligence for the fact that, beyond attending the formal teachings and rereading the transcript or maybe my notes once, I’m not devoting my time to studying. Four hours a day is already a lot, but it’s not enough to memorize what’s being given, which is what I would like to do and what feels like doing justice to the teaching.

I know I’m not wise enough and I haven’t studied the prerequisite subjects enough to truly understand the Abhidharmakosha, but I’m convinced that if I could just solder all the lists of associated faculties and mental activities and types of sovereign mind into my memory now, I’d be able to make sense of it all properly in some future time. Only I can’t.

IMG_3157

Partly because the groceries and the new steam-infusing vacuum machine and the pre-Lhosar deep clean and next month’s schedule and departmental meetings and new tasks with the communications team (yours truly may be contributing to a Dhagpo blog in the near future!), not to mention life, like teaching English classes, paying doctor’s bills, and studying for my French driver’s license (speedbumps are called donkey backs here). So yeah, partly all that. But partly also my heart.

Every time I study seriously, intensively, I live this. And every time, I forget. I always tell myself it’s the schedule, the being with people all the time, the intellectual gymnastics. But no, actually, if I can say it this way, I think it’s my heart.

Last night at dinner, Micka said, “After a certain amount of time with the teachings, I start to only see the flaws in everything.”

The first of the Four Noble Truths is that the nature of conditioned existence is suffering. The teachings go far beyond this, to its cause, to its ending, to the means to achieve that. Becoming free from suffering is the whole goal after all–well, half, anyway, getting everybody else free too is the whole goal. But for my part, when I start really looking and listening, I can’t help it, I tend to get a bit mired in the first part.

I am SO far from anything resembling clarity, one-pointed focus, or non-self-referential love. My faith is emotional and my understanding is personal. My discipline is superficial and mostly neurotic when it does function. That long list of mental activities that accompany afflicted mind…yaaah, I know them well.

IMG_3148

Whenever I reach this point, I tend to think of three things. Well, no, actually what happens is that I tend to start slipping into motionlessness, into the grey static where no act is meaningful enough to combat the hugeness of it all, and I no longer know how to greet the day or my mind or other human beings. Trying to be fair, this overwhelmption is maybe part of me, and I will have to accept it perhaps at many turns in my life. But Shamar Rinpoche said that if a person practices calm-abiding meditation long enough, she will no longer experience depression. Until my efforts take effect, I’m building a toolkit for when reality becomes overwhelming.

Here are my three things:

1) Some enlightened being in some treatise or sutra (maybe Gampopa in The Jewel Ornament of Liberation?) once said, “Ordinary beings cannot perceive the true nature of reality, of emptiness. It is too vast for the ordinary mind.” Which helps because it means that it’s normal that touching on this vastness through the teachings sends me spinning. I’m an ordinary being. I can only understand as much as my mind can take, and increasing my understanding means working the edge. Vertigo is part of the process, and I need to rest with that.

2) Dhongsar Jamyang Khyentse Rinpoche said in his book Not for Happiness that true compassion is like a dagger in the heart. So all this pain and this vision of anguish perhaps simply mean that I’m headed in the right direction. And practice is learning to see them and keep moving.

3) The Buddha gave us this one directly, and in the Heart Sutra no less: “Form is emptiness. Emptiness is form. Form is no other than emptiness. Emptiness is no other than form.” Though I am far from understanding it truly–speaking of that emptiness too vast for the ordinary mind–I try to remind myself that for all of its sharp edges and smothering weight, suffering has no essence. That if I keep going, the illusion will fragment on its own and I will be able to see suffering and its formlessness at the same time. And from there, I will truly be able to act, and act for the benefit of all.

It’s not exactly a monkey wrench or a tape measure, but it’s what I have for now and it helps, even if it doesn’t silence the static completely. And like always, the little worldly things that make up my worldly life are still here for me. They are what I know and where I’m at and maybe I am learning to be kind about what gives me solace on the path. I made cookies almost completely without feeling frivolous, and much more with gratitude for something simple and solid that I understand and touch and share. It’s not ultimate anything, but it might be relative something, and I think it’s going in the right direction.

Recipe…

This is just an adaptation of my favorite chocolate chip cookie recipe, itself an adaptation of the original TollHouse Recipe. It’s heavy on the salt, heavy on the brown sugar, and light on the eggs, which makes for a super flavorful chewy cookie with slightly crisp edges. Be sure not to overbake or you will lose out on the chewy middle. Sad face.

I spent years trying different choco chipper recipes, and since I met this one, I’ve never looked back. It’s as simple to make as it is divine in all its proper chocolate chip cookie qualities. A classic and a keeper.

If you are not gluten-free, you can simply sub 2 1/4 cups (280 grams) of all-purpose flour for the rest!

Gluten-Free Chocolate Chip Cookies

1/3 cup (40 grams) buckwheat flour

½ cup (45 grams) chestnut flour*

2/3 cup (60 grams) oat flour

1 ½ cups (135 grams) brown rice flour

1 teaspoon (5 mL) baking soda

1 teaspoon (5 mL) salt

1 cup/2 sticks (226 grams) unsalted butter, softened

1 ½ cups (300 grams) brown sugar

1 egg, room temperature

2 teaspoons (10 mL) vanilla

12 ounces (336 grams) chocolate chips or chopped chocolate bars

* If chestnut flour is hard to come by in your region, sorghum flour makes a good substitute and is pretty common in natural food stores these days.

Preheat the oven to 325˚ F (160˚ C)

In a medium-sized bowl, sift together the flours, baking soda, and salt. In a large bowl, beat together the butter and brown sugar until the sugar is dissolved. Beat in the egg and vanilla. Add the flour and mix gently until fully combined. Stir in the chocolate chips or chunks until evenly distributed.

Form into walnut-sized balls and place 1 ½ inches (3 cm) apart on a parchment lined baking sheet (Do NOT refer to the photo above. The cookies are way too close together; they were being prepped for freezing, not baking–beware or you will have a giant cookie rectangle instead of actual cookies!). Flatten slightly with fingertips to encourage even baking. Bake for nine minutes and allow to cool at least until firm enough to pick up, about fifteen minutes. Or if your blues are too strong and you need a cookie right this second, eat with a spoon and a little caution (hot melty chocolate burns!).

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “GF Chocolate Chip Cookies And Working With The Heart

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s